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11

Jul

Missouri Inmate Argues Public Defenders Let Him Down, And The Court Will Listen

  • By Hands Up Dont Shoot

Source

https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kcur/audio/2017/07/071117_JB_RickyKidd_Feature.mp3 “Kidd insists that he is one of many in Missouri condemned to prison not because of their actions but because of the state’s inability to perform one of its most critical duties – provide a lawyer for the defense of those too poor to afford one of their own.” Source

01

Jul

This is the issue many folks had the with Michael Brown settlement, not that the family settled, but that the family was lowballed. A dog killed by police owner got almost the same amount. No amount of money will bring Michael Brown back if white folks are getting paid millions for the death of a family pet what does the Brown settlement say about the value the powers that be put on black life?

  • By Hands Up Dont Shoot
This is the issue many folks had the with Michael Brown settlement, not that the family settled, but that the family was lowballed. A dog killed by police owner got almost the same amount. No amount of money will bring Michael Brown back if white folks are getting paid millions for the death of a family pet what does the Brown settlement say about the value the powers that be put on black life?

Killed By Cops: Dog’s Family Gets Nearly Same Amount As Michael Brown's

Michael Brown’s family awarded nearly the same amount as a family's beloved dog -- both shot dead by trigger-happy police.


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20

May

“The day after Edward Crawford’s death, his attorney Jerryl Christmas scrolled through the coverage on the St. Louis Post-Dispatch website. Unsurprisingly, the lead image on the paper’s May 5 story was the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph that showed Crawford winding up to throw a tear gas grenade during the Ferguson protests.<br><br>Beneath the photo, next to the caption, was a green button with the words, “Buy now.” <br><br>”I bought it that day,” Christmas says. “Just to prove that even in death they’re still profiting off him.”<br><br>Crawford, says Christmas, had long been frustrated by the Post-Dispatch’s seemingly ironclad ownership of the image that made him famous. Bootleg t-shirts, blog posts and social media accounts continually ripped off the photo, and such unauthorized usage invited take-down notices from the newspaper. Yet Crawford, who had five children, was no different than anyone else seeking to use the photo. Even though he was its subject, he had no rights to the image.<br><br>”He reflected on that all the time,” says Christmas. “He could not understand how he could see his image worldwide, and the Post owns it and sells his image, and him not having any access to it.” <br><br>”I had talked to Edward that Thursday,” says Christmas. “I had drafted a letter to the Post trying to reach an agreement. It was shortly after I had faxed it on Friday morning that I learned that Edward had passed.””

  • By Hands Up Dont Shoot
"The day after Edward Crawford's death, his attorney Jerryl Christmas scrolled through the coverage on the St. Louis Post-Dispatch website. Unsurprisingly, the lead image on the paper's May 5 story was the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph that showed Crawford winding up to throw a tear gas grenade during the Ferguson protests.

Beneath the photo, next to the caption, was a green button with the words, "Buy now."

"I bought it that day," Christmas says. "Just to prove that even in death they’re still profiting off him."

Crawford, says Christmas, had long been frustrated by the Post-Dispatch's seemingly ironclad ownership of the image that made him famous. Bootleg t-shirts, blog posts and social media accounts continually ripped off the photo, and such unauthorized usage invited take-down notices from the newspaper. Yet Crawford, who had five children, was no different than anyone else seeking to use the photo. Even though he was its subject, he had no rights to the image.

"He reflected on that all the time," says Christmas. "He could not understand how he could see his image worldwide, and the Post owns it and sells his image, and him not having any access to it."

"I had talked to Edward that Thursday," says Christmas. "I had drafted a letter to the Post trying to reach an agreement. It was shortly after I had faxed it on Friday morning that I learned that Edward had passed.""

Edward Crawford's Photo Helped the Post-Dispatch Win a Pulitzer. Now His Family Wants a Cut

The day after Edward Crawford's death, his attorney Jerryl Christmas scrolled through the coverage on the St. Louis Post-Dispatch website. Unsurprisingly, the lead image on...


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