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#StayWoke

24

Nov

Minimum wage was decreased from $10 to $7.70 in August 2017. Yes you read that right. There are consequences to keeping wages low: low worker morale, parents being forced to work 2-3 jobs to make ends meet leaving little time for quality parenting when their #1 priority should be their children. Look at the world we live in. Now factor in high crime, high unemployment, a scandal ridden police department, an oppressive municipal/justice system, millions lost due to unrest the past 3 years and an exodus of residents and businesses… <br><br>.15? FOH.

  • By Hands Up Dont Shoot

Minimum wage was decreased from $10 to $7.70 in August 2017. Yes you read that right. There are consequences to keeping wages low: low worker morale, parents being forced to work 2-3 jobs to make ends meet leaving little time for quality parenting when their #1 priority should be their children. Look at the world we live in. Now factor in high crime, high unemployment, a scandal ridden police department, an oppressive municipal/justice system, millions lost due to unrest the past 3 years and an exodus of residents and businesses…

.15? FOH.

Inflation pushes Missouri’s minimum wage to $7.85 for 2018

Inflation adjustment is biggest in three years

24

Nov

Missouri has some of the worst schools in the nation… may districts have struggled with accreditation, St. Louis City Public Schools and the majority of other districts serving black children either lost accreditation, are provisionally accredited or regained accreditation after loosened requirements.<br><br>We’ve had situations of teachers and coaches preying on students sexually, a principle murdering a pregnant teacher (his girlfriend), board members accused of embezzling money, teachers duct taping a 7th grade girl to the chair and let’s not forget the whole school to prison pipeline… and that’s just off top…elected leaders have you think all the districts’ ills stem from bad parenting or a ‘culture of whatever the fuck’ they deem it to be. They take zero responsibility.<br><br>Young people see through them. Instead of teaching them, they lost them.

  • By Hands Up Dont Shoot
Missouri has some of the worst schools in the nation... may districts have struggled with accreditation, St. Louis City Public Schools and the majority of other districts serving black children either lost accreditation, are provisionally accredited or regained accreditation after loosened requirements.

We've had situations of teachers and coaches preying on students sexually, a principle murdering a pregnant teacher (his girlfriend), board members accused of embezzling money, teachers duct taping a 7th grade girl to the chair and let's not forget the whole school to prison pipeline... and that's just off top...elected leaders have you think all the districts' ills stem from bad parenting or a 'culture of whatever the fuck' they deem it to be. They take zero responsibility.

Young people see through them. Instead of teaching them, they lost them.

Enrollment decline has Ferguson-Florissant weighing redistricting options

The district has lost 800 students in the past three years and has several outdated, underused buildings that are expensive to maintain.


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24

Nov

There is no real commitment to change… just money thrown at commissions, committees and monitors to play to the media and pacify the masses… until the dust settles, reality sets in, then everybody starts pointing fingers… <br><br>”The city has paid nearly $500,000 to the monitor team overseeing its police and court reforms, but city leaders question what they’ve gotten for their money, especially after the departure of the original lead monitor.<br><br>Washington attorney Clark Kent Ervin resigned in September after serving a little over a year as lead monitor overseeing the consent agreement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Ferguson, the St. Louis suburb where Michael Brown was fatally shot by a police officer in 2014. Boston attorney Natashia Tidwell, who has been with the Ferguson monitor team since its start, now leads it. <br><br>“It begs the question: What are residents getting out of [monitoring]” Knowles said. “They’re supposed to be getting transparency. They’re supposed to be getting regular updates and engagement from the monitor. They haven’t gotten any of it.”<br><br>The buck stops with Mayor Knowles who entered into these agreements, who was responsible for seeing this through, but instead brought in a lot of out of town folks and paid them handsomely… for nothing. This is local leadership all day.

  • By Hands Up Dont Shoot
There is no real commitment to change... just money thrown at commissions, committees and monitors to play to the media and pacify the masses... until the dust settles, reality sets in, then everybody starts pointing fingers...

"The city has paid nearly $500,000 to the monitor team overseeing its police and court reforms, but city leaders question what they’ve gotten for their money, especially after the departure of the original lead monitor.

Washington attorney Clark Kent Ervin resigned in September after serving a little over a year as lead monitor overseeing the consent agreement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Ferguson, the St. Louis suburb where Michael Brown was fatally shot by a police officer in 2014. Boston attorney Natashia Tidwell, who has been with the Ferguson monitor team since its start, now leads it.

“It begs the question: What are residents getting out of [monitoring]” Knowles said. “They’re supposed to be getting transparency. They’re supposed to be getting regular updates and engagement from the monitor. They haven’t gotten any of it.”

The buck stops with Mayor Knowles who entered into these agreements, who was responsible for seeing this through, but instead brought in a lot of out of town folks and paid them handsomely... for nothing. This is local leadership all day.

Ferguson leaders question monitoring team's $500K tab

FERGUSON, Mo. — The city has paid nearly $500,000 to the monitor team overseeing its police and court reforms, but city leaders question what they’ve gotten for their money, especially


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